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The Ring

What Does a Christian Wedding Really Entail?

What Does a Christian Wedding Really Entail?

This is the primary reason why most Christian weddings usually take place in a place of worship; the Church, in God's company. Even though loads of Christian bridal ceremonies are held every year, they usually vary based on individual tastes and inclinations and denominations. For example, a Catholic wedding is usually different from an Anglican wedding which is also different from a Protestant wedding. The difference mostly lies in the programming and rituals, but other things are standard in all Christian weddings. Some of those standard processes are such as.

  • Wedding pictures. They usually start at least an hour before the beginning of the service and should be finished at least 45 minutes before the wedding service begins.
  • The procession. This comes when all guests are settled in the house of worship, and it's during this time when the chaplain, the groom accompanied by his best man and groomsmen enter the Church from a side door. Music plays a very primary role in this part of proceedings and the wedding service as a whole.
  • An opening prayer is then said before the preacher gives a welcome message immediately after everybody has settled down. This is where the minister explains to the audience of the logic behind their gathering after which the minister thanks them for finding some time to come and be part of the wedding service.
  • Giving away the bride. The minister in charge asks who is giving the bride away, and the father of the bride or even the mother says they do. This is usually a perfect way to engage the folks of both the groom and bride in the wedding service. In case both parents are not alive or present, the couple can ask godparents to give away the bride.
  • The sermon. Everyone is usually settled when the sermon begins. The minister uses the moment to talk about the importance and meaning of marriage while also reminding the audience of faith. It is the sermon that sets the tone of the wedding depending on the character of the minister.
  • The pledge is what follows next, and it's where the groom and the bride declare to everyone in attendance that they have come out of their own will to get married.
  • Declaration of intent is the stage where the minister asks if there is any person present with a reason why the couple should not tie the knot to come forward or to forever hold their peace.
  • The vows come next. The couple can choose to say the traditional vows, or they can come up with their own vows consisting of their commitments and promises for the future.
  • After the vows, the next step is usually the exchanging of rings as a symbol of their marriage. The bands represent eternity as they are supposed to be worn for life.
  • Lighting of the unity candle follows next. This is where the groom and the bride light up a big candle in Unisom using their two small candles to symbolize that the two have come together and are now one.
  • The minister gives his/her closing remarks ending the service while blessing the newlyweds. Marriage proclamation follows where the minister says, "By the powers vested in me, I now declare you husband and wife." The newlyweds then sign the registry making the wedding legal in front of two witnesses.

After the ceremony is over, the newlyweds are usually the first ones to leave followed by their wedding party, family, friends, and the minister.