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The Ring

What Does a Muslim Wedding Entail?

What Does a Muslim Wedding Entail?

Islam sweeps across a distinct turf of lifestyle with traditions and followers coming from all corners of the world. Weddings form an intrinsic part of the Islamic way of life and are ordered by the Holy Quran as one of the primary obligations that must be fulfilled by all Muslims. The following are some of the Muslim wedding rituals.

  • Salatul Istikhara. This is where a match is concluded by families of the bride and the groom. It is an arranged marriage where parents find the ideal matches for their sons and daughters. The Imam of the nearby mosque is aped while performing a unique prayer seeking Gods approval for the contracted union. He requests Allah to bless the couples and this act as the official announcement of marriage to the community.
  • Imam Zamin. This is where the groom's mother pays a visit to the bride’s home while bearing sweets and presents. She also carries silver and gold coins cloaked in a silk scarf which she uses to tie a knot around her future daughter-in-law's wrist.
  • This marks the official engagement service between the groom, the bride, and their corresponding families. Colleagues and relatives from both families come together on a specific day to observe the groom and the bride exchanging bands. The couple is then pampered with clothes, sweets, and fruits by each family sealing the intention of marriage between the two families.
  • This is the wedding party heading to the wedding venue. The groom leaves his house with great show and pomp in the company of his close friends and family. The family of the bride organizes the transport of the groom to the wedding venue. They send a car that is beautifully decorated to carry the groom while his relatives and friends follow the car to the wedding venue.
  • The groom is welcomed to the wedding venue by the bride's family who meets him at the entrance. He is then offered a drink of sweet Sherbet by his brother in law while his family member is sprinkled with ittar-scented water as they go into the wedding venue.
  • This is the wedding service. It is officiated by a Maulvi or a religious priest. The men and women usually sit separately during the whole wedding celebration. Men seat around the groom while women seat around the bride. The family of the groom then compliments the bride with a predetermined amount of money to seek her permit for marrying the groom. The religious priest presiding over the ceremony then says a prayer from the Quran and then asks the bride if she is consenting to get married to the groom. He asks the bride three times in a row if she has given her consent after which the priest recites paragraphs from Quran as marriage vows.
  • Arsi Mushaf. This is where the couple gets a chance to lay eyes on each other for the first time after the marriage has been sanctified. During this ceremony, a mirror is kept in between the groom and the bride and the Quran is placed on top.